THE EVERYONE GRADUATES CENTER AT JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY REPORTS

NINE NETWORK OF PUBLIC MEDIA IS HELPING TO REVERSE HIGH SCHOOL DROPOUT TREND

 

Nine Network of Public Media Receives American Graduate Champion Award for Their Vital Community Service

                 

 

 

   

     

   

(November 22, 2013) ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI – According to a recent report from the Everyone Graduates Center at the Johns Hopkins University School of Education (http://www.americangraduate.org/hopkins-evaluation), the Nine Network of Public Media is helping keep more St. Louis students on track to graduate as part of the public broadcaster’s role in American Graduate: Let’s Make It Happen (www.americangraduate.org) initiative. The Nine Network of Public Media recently received an American Graduate Champion award from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) for their commitment to education and support of students and their families. A national public media initiative, American Graduateexamines the nation’s high school dropout crisis and empowers communities to implement solutions.

 

 

“As the local and national leader of the American Graduate initiative, the Nine Network has made a long-term commitment to work collaboratively to improve outcomes for young people across the country,” says Jack Galmiche, president and CEO of the Nine Network of Public Media.  “Our work in St. Louis with more than 50 local partners continues to serve as a national model, inspiring communities throughout America. We’re very proud to be part of this community and proud to be instrumental in a national public media effort that we believe will strengthen our country.”

 

The recent national report confirmed the impact that public media continues to have in helping to improve high school graduation rates. Through the American Graduate: Let’s Make It Happen initiative, public broadcasting stations have engaged in over 1,000 partnerships with businesses, schools, faith-based and other nonprofits, working together to inspire dialogue and action toward solutions and help more young people stay on the path to a high school diploma. Over 1,700 hours of national and local public media content and events, including American Graduate Day, have brought disparate organizations together and inspired local citizens to become American Graduate Champions, donating time and other resources.

 

As part of a survey of American Graduate community partners conducted by the Everyone Graduates Center, respondents underscored that public media stations told the story of the dropout crisis in a way that enabled more people to get involved. Community partners reported that public media facilitated greater focus and collaboration among community organizations, and that students’ participation in American Graduate programs resulted in their increased commitment to school, to graduating and to preparing for their future.

 

As an example of the initiative’s success, Johns Hopkins reports that the Nine Network of Public Media organized 21 area school districts to participate in a free Gallup Student Poll where nearly 16,000 high school students responded: 46 percent felt “discouraged or stuck,” 43 percent felt “disengaged or not engaged” and 33 percent felt they were “suffering or struggling.” The responses will be used by the Nine Network and the St. Louis Collective Impact group to guide content creation and mobilize ongoing efforts to improve graduation rates. 

 

“Public media has achieved this success by raising awareness and building knowledge of the issue, highlighting proven solutions, and fostering community action toward common goals—key strategies identified by education experts as essential for progress,” says John Bridgeland, CEO, Civic Enterprises, and co-author of Building a Grad Nation report. “The true power of public media to improve civic life lies in their unique assets combined with their national reach and community relationships,” adds Dr. Robert Balfanz, co-director of the Everyone Graduates Center at Johns Hopkins University School of Education.

 

An executive summary from John Bridgeland and the full report by the Everyone Graduates Center at the Johns Hopkins University School of Education are available at http://americangraduate.org/hopkins-evaluation

 

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ABOUT THE NINE NETWORK OF PUBLIC MEDIA

 

The Nine Network of Public Media is a multifaceted public media organization creating a network of individuals and organizations empowered by public media to strengthen civic life. One of the nation’s most watched public television stations, Nine offers the people of the St. Louis region multiple ways to explore the world and become engaged in civic life, including the Nine Center for Public Engagement, nineAcademy, nineNet.org and four distinct broadcast channels (Nine PBS, Nine World, Nine Create and Nine Kids). The Nine Network’s rich legacy of serving the community was launched in 1954 and continues through our mission of bringing St. Louis together as we connect our region to the world and the world to St. Louis.

 

ABOUT AMERICAN GRADUATE
American Graduate: Let’s Make It Happen is helping local communities identify and implement solutions to the high school dropout crisis. American Graduate demonstrates public media’s commitment to education and its deep roots in every community it serves. Beyond providing programming that educates, informs and inspires, public radio and television stations—locally owned and operated—are an important resource in helping to address critical issues, such as the dropout rate. In addition to national programming, more than 80 public radio and television stations in over 30 states have launched on-the- ground efforts working with community and at risk youth to keep students on track to high school graduation. More than 1,000 partnerships have been formed locally through American Graduate, and CPB is working with Alma and Colin Powell’s America’s Promise Alliance and Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

 

ABOUT CPB

 

The Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), a private, nonprofit corporation created by Congress in 1967, is the steward of the federal government’s investment in public broadcasting. It helps support the operations of more than 1,400 locally owned and  operated public television and radio stations nationwide, and is the largest single source of funding for research, technology and program development for public radio, television and related online services.